Health

10 Health Myths Everyone Believes That Are Actually False

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I'll admit it, I turn to the internet for a lot of my health advice. If it's super serious, I'll head to the doctor. But for the most part I find myself relying on the advice of strangers, or even friends and family, when it comes to basic health tips.

But as it turns out, that might not be my best option. Shocker, right? It's almost as if the best medical advice comes from those who actually know what they're talking about.

1. Water Consumption

MYTH:

We need to drink 8 glasses of water per day in order to stay hydrated.

REALITY:

If you drink a glass of water whenever you get thirsty, you'll be fine. Research shows that people who only drink when they're thirsty consume enough water to stay hydrated and healthy. Of course, if you live in a warmer climate, are exercising, or find that your urine is dark yellow, then it's probably best to up your intake. There are also other ways to get your fluid intake, like soup, fruits, veggies, juice, coffee, or tea.

2. Chocolate Consequences

Independent

MYTH:

Eating chocolate gives you acne.

REALITY:

It does nothing. I mean, it's not good for you, but eating chocolate doesn't affect your acne outbreaks at all. Scientists conducted a month-long study which saw dozens of people fed real chocolate bars which contained 10 times the usual amount of chocolate, and others fed fake chocolate bars. At the end of the study, there was "no difference" between the groups. Looks like my mother lied to me...

3. Eggs and your Heart

MYTH:

Eating eggs is bad for your heart health.

REALITY:

They're actually pretty good for your heart as long as you're in good health. The yolks contain cholesterol which can be bad for your heart, but the amount of cholesterol in an egg yolk isn't that big of a deal for most of us. Plus, eggs have a lot of nutrients, such as omega-3s, which can lower your risk of heart disease.

4. Carrots and your Vision

Health

MYTH:

Eating carrots means you'll be able to see better at night.

REALITY:

While the vitamin A in carrots is beneficial to your sight, it doesn't help you see at night. The myth is believed to have started during World War II, when the British government used it as propaganda in order to hide the existence of a secret radar technology they'd developed.

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