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Homeless Veteran Finally Getting Justice He Deserves Over Missing Donation Money

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After a highly publicized legal battle, Johnny Bobbitt Jr. is finally getting the justice he deserves.

The homeless veteran received mass media attention back in November when he spent his last $20 on gas for Kate McClure, who was stuck on the I-95 after her car ran out of fuel.

McClure and her boyfriend Mark D'Amico were touched by Bobbitt's good deed, and started a GoFundMe page to raise money so he could get back on his feet.

While the fundraiser had an original goal of $10,000 the public was so touched by the story that donations rose to more than a staggering $400,000 from 14,000 contributors.

However, nearly a year later Bobbitt - who's back on the streets - alleged the couple had withheld his donations, and spent the money on themselves instead.

"I think it might have been good intentions in the beginning, but with that amount of money, I think it became greed." Bobbitt told the Philadelphia Inquirer .

Although Bobbitt claimed McClure and D'Amico spent the money on lavish vacations, a helicopter ride, and BMW, they denied his accusations and said they hadn't spent a dime of his donations.

D'Amico told the publication that while there's "well over" $150,000 left, he wouldn't give Bobbitt the rest of the money until he sobered up.

"Giving him all that money, it's never going to happen. I'll burn it in front of him," he said, adding that giving him the cash would be akin to "giving him a loaded gun."

On August 30, Bobbitt, McClure, and D'Amico went to court, where Superior Court Judge Paula T. Dow ruled in favor of the homeless veteran and ordered McClure and D'Amico to transfer the remaining amount of money into an escrow account within 24 hours.

"I wish it didn’t come to this. I hate that it came to this," Bobbitt told WPVI after the hearing. "I always felt like I was in a weird situation. I didn’t want to be pressuring to get a lawyer or do anything because I didn’t want to seem ungrateful."

However, things took a heartbreaking turn when it was revealed there was no money left.

"There is no money left. Where the money went, I have no idea," Bobbitt's lawyer Christopher C. Fallon Jr. said, adding that the former ammunition technician is "completely devastated" over the revelation.

"That's a lot of money to go through to in just a short period of time," he continued.

But in another twist, on September 6, GoFundMe announced its commitment to give Bobbitt the donations he's yet to receive.

“We are pleased to report that Johnny will be made whole and we’re committing that he’ll get the balance of the funds that he has not yet received or benefited from," the online fundraising company said in a joint statement with Cozen O’Connor, the law firm representing Bobbitt.

"GoFundMe’s goal has always been to ensure Johnny gets the support he deserves."

The announcement came the same day the Burlington County law enforcement authorities executed a search warrant on McClure and D'Amico's house for their criminal investigation.

WPVI captured a video of police officers removing boxes of materials from their Florence property, and McClure's BMW loaded onto a truck.

Although details of the investigation are scarce, no charges have yet to be laid.

"We’ll continue to assist with the ongoing law enforcement investigation," the GoFundMe statement continued.

"As we’ve said, our platform is backed by the GoFundMe Guarantee, which means that in the rare case that GoFundMe, law enforcement, or a user finds campaigns are misused, donors and beneficiaries are protected," GoFundMe's statement read.

"We’re fulfilling that commitment today and we will continue to work with Johnny’s team to make sure he’s receiving all donated amounts."

[H/T: Courier Post, NBC News]

Thankfully Bobbitt has gotten the justice he deserves. Share this article with your family and friends to tell them the good news!

Maya has been working at Shared for a year. She just begrudgingly spent $200 on a gym membership. Contact her at maya@shared.com