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Pilots Caught Playing On Social Media While Flying A Plane Full Of Passengers

I love to travel. I'm that person who is always searching for flight deals and dreaming about my next getaway.

But ironically, I hate flying. I can never be comfortable on a plane, and honestly, there's just something about being 30,000 feet up in the air that scares the bejesus out of me.

Plus, I have a hard time putting my trust in the pilots. I'm not saying that they aren't qualified, but when they're locked away in the cockpit, who knows what they're really up to.

I wish I could convince myself that whoever is in charge of maneuvering the aircraft (and my life) is 100 percent focused at the task at hand, but that would be me putting too much trust in a stranger.

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Well, a recent video of pilots goofing around in the cockpit while carrying a plane full of passengers surfaced, and it justified all my worries.

To say that their actions were dangerous is an understatement.

EasyJet captain Michael Castellucci is known for regularly uploading selfies and videos of himself and his colleagues at work and in between flights, but this time he crossed a line.

Along with his co-pilot, Castellucci posted a number of photos and videos on social media while on a flight between Paris and Madrid. He started documenting their flight on Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook before takeoff, and it only escalated the higher they got.

While their hijinks were shocking, the public is even more disappointed with the way the company initially chose to remedy the situation.

Unbeknownst to the passengers, their pilots were turning into viral stars by uploading silly videos on social media.

Within a few hours, one of the posts captioned "Dancing in the cockpit," featuring a computer-generated dancing character garnered over 6,000 views, according to The Sun.

While some people didn't seem to mind the pilots's actions, there were many who weren't pleased.

“The cockpit duo were not focused on the controls, just on having a good time. It only takes seconds for something catastrophic to go wrong, even in cruise control," one viewer commented on the video.

"It’s dangerous, unprofessional, and sends out the wrong image. High jinks in the cockpit at 30,000ft is never a good look," they added.

"It might be wise to save cartoons and dancing for the ground," said another. "No passenger wants to think their captain is focused on entertaining his online followers rather than ensuring safety."

Customers who deemed the pilots's actions "dangerous" and "irresponsible" filed complaints against them, but the initial response they received wasn't what they were expecting.

A spokesman for EasyJet explained that the pilots weren't performing any maneuvers at the time, so passengers weren't endangered. However, they would be speaking to the pilots.

"Whilst at no point was the safety of the passengers compromised, this falls short of the high standards EasyJet expects of its pilots," said the spokesman. "We will speak to the pilots involved."

The statement published by The Sun made it appear as though a strict talking to is all Castellucci and his colleague would be getting, but a lengthier statement reassured concerned customers that they're taking the matter seriously

"It is not acceptable and is not representative of the thousands of highly professional pilots who work for the airline. We take this issue seriously and as such the pilots have been suspended (in line with our procedures) pending a disciplinary investigation."

The company later confirmed that the pair had been suspended, "pending a disciplinary investigation."

This isn't the first time that Castellucci has landed himself in hot water. Last year, he was involved in a sexist joke fiasco.

"The only things co-pilots need to say — ‘Nice landing Sir, I buy the first round, I’ll take the fat chick’," he captioned a video on Instagram in which he was jokingly telling his junior colleagues what he expected of them.

Following the latest incident, the captain has since deleted his social media accounts, and has declined to comment on the scandal.

Obviously, not all pilots act in this manner, but a story like this doesn't do much to help reassure people like me who don't like to fly. The pair's actions raises the question: What are pilots really up to when they're in the cockpit, away from everyone else's line of sight?

What do you think about these pilots's actions?

Awa has been writing for Shared for 3 years. She is a serial snacker who unapologetically loves celebrity gossip. Drop her a line at awa@shared.com.