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Shrinking Glacier Reveals Frozen Couple Who Went Missing 75 Years Ago

EPA / BBC

In August of 1942, Marcelin and Francine Dumoulin left their home and were never seen again. Marcelin was a shoemaker and his wife, Francine was a teacher, who spent most of her adult life pregnant.

They were also farmers who tended cattle in the Swiss Alps.

It was rare that the husband and wife would set out together on the 2, 600 meter (8,530 foot) climb up the mountain and no one is sure why they chose to do so on that day.

Despite extensive search efforts, the Dumoulins were never found. Long after rescuers gave up, their children never stopped believing that one day they would find their parents.

Within two months of their parents' disappearance, the children were separated and placed with different families. Sadly, they lost contact over the years.

It would take 75 years for nature to reveal what really happened to their parents all that time ago...

It would take global warming and a ski-lift operator to solve the mystery of the husband and wife who disappeared 75 years ago. Local police report that their bodies were spotted on the Tsanfleuron glacier above Les Diablerets resort outside of Geneva, Switzerland.

The ski lift employee found backpacks, tin bowls and a glass bottle along with male and female shoes. Upon closer inspection, the employee also noticed part of a body under the ice.

Valais police took a book, a backpack and a watch - also found in the frozen tomb - for forensic analysis. Bernhard Tschannen, director of the ski-lift company, Glacier 3000, suspects that the couple had fallen into a crevasse.

"The bodies were lying near each other. It was a man and a woman wearing clothing dating from the period of World War Two," he told Le Matin.

The couple's youngest daughter, Marceline Udry-Dumoulin told Le Matin that she had never given up hoping that she would find her parents, she even climbed the glacier three times in search of them.

She now plans to give her parents the funeral they deserve, and she won't be wearing black to the ceremony. "I think that white would be more appropriate. It represents hope, which I never lost," she said.

No one can imagine how terrible it must have been to loose her mother and father at the young age of just four years old. But there are two consolations to this tragedy: the family finally has their closure and these lost parents were not alone - they had each other in their final moments.

[h/t Le Matin / All That Is Interesting / BBC]