Entertainment | Family

Angelina Jolie Shares The Most Important Piece Of Advice She Tells Her Daughters

HELLO! Magazine

When it comes to the lives of celebrities, everyone has an opinion.

From their choices of movie roles, significant others, and parenting styles, those on the A-list live under a microscope, and are judged by their every move.

Oscar Award-winning actress Angelina Jolie is no different, as the press has documented her life since she was a late teen. Even my 90-year-old grandmother knows the ins and outs of the Changeling actress's life, and she hasn't gone to see a movie in the past decade.

Most recently, Jolie has been in the news for her humanitarian work and relatively new role as a single parent.

Being a parent to one child, let alone six, is never an easy task, but the activist seems to take each day in stride.

In Elle magazine’s March issue, Jolie sat down with former Secretary of State John Kerry to discuss a wide range of topics, including the important advice she regularly gives her daughters Vivienne, 9, Shiloh, 11, and Zahara, 13.

Jolie, who is also the mother to sons Knox, 9, Pax, 14, and Maddox, 16, told Kerry she often tells her daughters to focus on humanitarian pursuits rather than superficial ideals.

“I tell my daughters, 'What sets you apart is what you are willing to do for others. Anyone can put on a dress and makeup. It’s your mind that will define you. Find out who you are, what you think, and what you stand for. And fight for others to have those same freedoms.  A life of service is worth living,'" Jolie said.

“I think of how hard women fought to get us to where we are today," she adds. "Everything counts, from the way you hold yourself in daily life and educate yourself on your own rights, to solidarity with other women around the world."

Jolie appears as the magazine's cover model in honor of International Women's Day on March 8, and was joined by Shiloh and Vivienne for the inside page spread.

Along with her advice to her daughters, Jolie also discussed issues surrounding sexual violence against women, climate change and how she became an activist.

"I was quite anti-politics when I was young. I started working on human-rights issues and meeting refugees and survivors mostly because I wanted to learn. I also had this romantic idea that I would get my boots on and be a humanitarian," Jolie said. "But at a certain point, you realize that’s not enough. You have to find the root of the problem."

What is the most important piece of advice you would tell your daughters?

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