Royals | Celebrity

World's Most Bitter Prince Refused To Be Buried Next To Wife But Surprises Her At Funeral

What's the longest grudge you've ever held against your spouse? Not just a playful reminder now and then, but a legitimate, infuriating grudge? Even 2 years is an insane amount of time.

Not if you ask Prince Henrik of Denmark, 2 years is easy. For him, the grudge he held against his wife has been boiling for 45 years.

Henrik de Monpezat served in the French army during the Algerian war and in 1962 he joined the French Foreign Affairs ministry as a secretary at the embassy in London. De Monpezat earned many honors for his military service and is considered a decorated veteran.

The ex-military man married heir apparent Margrethe Alexandrine Þórhildur Ingrid in 1967, while her father was King of Denmark. In 1972, she succeeded her father, becoming Queen Margrethe of Denmark. She is still serving to this day.

You would think that Henrik would be happy his wife become ruler of an entire nation, but news is coming out that he's extremely bitter about a very particular part of her monarchy. He's so bitter, in fact, that he doesn't even want to be buried with her.

A representative for the Danish royal family announced that Prince Henrik has chosen not to be buried next to Queen Margrethe, when that time comes, in the custom-designed sarcophagus at Roskilde Cathedral in Denmark.

Prince Henrik of Denmark believes he's being "discriminated against" because he isn't called King Henrik, but rather Prince. The title is what any man married to the Queen of a nation receives, and is technically the title of Prince Consort. Prince Philip of England also goes by this title.

“It makes me angry that I am subjected to discrimination,” he told the French newspaper Le Figaro. “Denmark, which is otherwise known as an avid defender of gender equality, is apparently willing to consider husbands as worth less than their wives.”

“It is no secret that the prince for many years has been unhappy with his role and the title he has been awarded in the Danish monarchy,” the family’s director of communications told a Danish newspaper. “For the prince, the decision not to be buried beside the queen is the natural consequence of not having been treated equally to his spouse — by not having the title and role he has desired.”

In 2015, Prince Henrik said he will "never accept" that he doesn't get to be king.

Update:

On February 13, 2018 Prince Henrik of Denmark died at the age of 83.

The controversial French-born prince had been diagnosed with dementia and was admitted to hospital with a lung infection. His flamboyant style was both loved and criticised by Danes.

The prince died "peacefully in his sleep" at the Fredensborg Castle, north of Copenhagen, with Queen Margrethe and their two sons - Crown Prince Frederick and Prince Joachim - at his side.

Following his wish, he will be cremated, with half his ashes spread over Danish seas and the other half buried in the royal private garden at the Fredensborg Castle.

Queen Margrethe already has a specially-built sarcophagus in a cathedral west of Copenhagen where the remains of Danish royals are buried

According to Hello! , before his death, Prince Henrik of Denmark planned one final and utterly romantic surprise for his widow, Queen Margrethe. He asked for the flowers at his funeral to be arranged into a "blooming garden" to pay tribute to his partner of 50 years.

The idea of a "blooming garden" holds a special meaning for the couple; during Henrik's wedding speech in 1967, the Frenchman referred to his new country Denmark as a "blossoming garden", but added that his bride was the "most beautiful adornment" in the garden.

The Danish royal palace revealed the heartwarming surprise on Instagram, by sharing a photo of the sea of flowers at the private funeral. The caption explained: "The queen was met by a sea of flowers at the Christiansborg Palace Church.

In August, the palace's communications chief, Lene Balleby said: "It is no secret that the prince for many years has been unhappy with his role and the title he has been awarded in the Danish monarchy. This discontent has grown more and more in recent years.

"For the prince, the decision not to buried beside the queen is the natural consequence of not having been treated equally to his spouse - by not having the title and role he has desired."

Royal couples are traditionally buried together in Roskilde Cathedral, west of Copenhagen.

I guess "until death do us part" is being taken very literally for these two.

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Prins Henrik er blevet bisat.

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Head of Content, reality TV watcher and lover of cookies. emma@shared.com