Did You Know | Family

Why Retirement Is Killing Marriage

Photo courtesy of Cordell and Cordell - Flickr

When we say "till death do us part," we really mean it at the time.

But several years or decades later, things change, and those promises we made at the altar suddenly seem like they were spoken by a different person.

According to data from the National Center for Health Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau, divorce rates for adults ages 50 and older have nearly doubled since the '90s.

For people ages 65 and up, the divorce rate has nearly tripled.

Baby Boomers are contributing to this sharp rise in divorce rates, but Millennials are unintentionally shrinking it on a larger scale.

Why Is Retirement Killing Marriage?

The dream of living happily ever after with someone may have just come to an end.

Many married couples from previous generations stayed married until their final day, but nowadays everyone seems to be getting divorced.

People who have been married for decades suddenly call it quits close to or during retirement.

"Research indicates that many later-life divorcees have grown unsatisfied with their marriages over the years and are seeking opportunities to pursue their own interests and independence for the remaining years of their lives," PEW Research Center explained.

The reality is that people change overtime, and if you're interests are no longer aligned with your spouse, you drift apart.

When a couple divorces, research has also found that divorced women are much happier than divorced men.

A survey by Style magazine asked more than 1,000 divorced British men and women, who had an average age of 54, more than 30 questions about their personal lives and the reason behind their breakups.

The study found 53% of women say they're happier post-divorce, compared to 32% of men who say the same thing.

Is There A Secret That Keeps Millennial Couples Together?

According to new research by University of Maryland sociology professor Philip Cohen, overall divorce rates are declining, thanks to Millennial.

The reason why is because couples nowadays are extremely selective in choosing a life partner.

“Marriage is rarer, and more stable, than it was in the past," he noted, adding, "We see people getting married at older ages, people getting married with college degrees already. They are less likely to be already divorced or have children when they get married, both of which are risk factors for divorce.”

Cohen also describes marriage as a way to show "status" in society. He found that poorer Americans choose not to tie the knot even if they share children.

"Marriage is more and more an achievement of status, rather than something that people do regardless of how they’re doing.”

Here are five more secrets to a successful marriage

1. Find common ground

The key to a successful marriage is marrying someone you actually like.

For most couples, the honeymoon phase eventually dies off, which is why marrying a companion is more important than marrying just a lover.

2. Have an optimistic outlook

You would be surprised by how much difference an optimistic outlook can make a different in all aspects of your life.

The reason why is because happiness and positivity rubs off on other people. You become much more likable, and in turn, others are more willing to compromise and find common ground with you.

3. Listen, and show up

Be there for your spouse.

Sometimes it's not your marriage that's falling apart, but other aspects of your lives.

Always make time to listen to each other, and be there during those difficult times.

4. Accept that there will be good days and bad days

Every marriage reaches a crisis point, sometimes this happens several times, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's the end.

This is a time that calls for immediate reflection. Find a way that works best for both of you to fix the problem.

5. Compromise

You hear this word so often when talking about marriage, and yet failing to compromise is one of the main reasons why people get divorced.

It's the foundation of a successful democracy and the way many conflicts can be resolved.

With that in mind, choose your battles. Some things are just not worth arguing about.

[Sources - Slate, Pew Research Center]

What are you thoughts on these studies? Share your opinion in the comments section!

Moojan has been a writer at Shared for almost a year. When she's not on the lookout for viral content, she's looking at cute animal photos. Reach her at moojan@shared.com.