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Toxic Metals Found In Nordstrom Jewelry And Other Popular Chains

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If you thought the greenish tint that some jewelry leaves on your skin is bad, you've heard nothing yet.

A recent report conducted by the Center for Environmental Health revealed that a large amount of jewelry sold at popular retail chains like Ross, Nordstrom Rack, and Papaya contain a toxic metal that may cause cancer.

Affected pieces are being sold individually, while others are being sold as accessories to shirts and dresses. The ones sold with clothing items have been found to be made entirely of cadmium.

You've probably heard of cadmium before, but the idea of wearing a toxic metal rarely comes to mind when putting on a piece of flashy jewelry.

The Dangers of This Toxic Metal

cadmium
Pure cadmium is a soft, bluish-white metal.Wikimedia Commons

The non-profit organization tested samples of jewelry from these retail chains in San Francisco Bay Area in the past year.

"Lab testing found 31 adult jewelry items purchased from retail stores were at least 40 percent cadmium, and most were more than 90 percent," results shared with AP stated.

One pendant from Ross was found to be 100% cadmium.

What's alarming about these findings is that the state of California outlawed cadmium in children's jewelry years ago (only allowing 0.03%), but the fact that this toxic metal is allowed in adult jewelry is concerning.

As for the effects of cadmium, this toxic metal is believed to be absorbed through the skin, but is mostly a risk when ingested or breathed in.

And when it accumulates in the body, cadmium can damage the kidneys and bones. Also, research has shown that cadmium can cause trigger skin rashes, including psoriasis.

It's not just jewelry that has worrisome amounts of cadmium, popular baby food products also contain this toxic metal.

In August, a Consumers Report investigation found that 50 different packaged foods made for young children contained "measurable levels" of heavy metals, including cadmium.

These concerning levels in popular snacks, cereals, prepared entrées, and packaged fruits and vegetables, mostly marketed for babies and toddlers, is believed to possibly pose severe health risks in the long run.

[H/T: Washington Post via Associated Press]

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Moojan has been a writer at Shared for almost a year. When she's not on the lookout for viral content, she's looking at cute animal photos. Reach her at moojan@shared.com.